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As chair of the firm’s Labor & Employment Practice Group, Bob Horton represents management in all areas of labor and employment law. Bob’s practice consists primarily of counseling clients regarding employment issues and defending companies against all manner of employment claims throughout the U.S.

The Background

The Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA) became effective on June 27, 2023. On August 11, 2023, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued its proposed regulations on the PWFA. After receiving over 100,000 public comments on its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, the EEOC issued its final rule and interpretive guidance to implement the PWFA on April 15, 2024 (Final Rule). Continue Reading Summary of the EEOC’s Final Regulations Implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act

Join us on May 14 for a deep dive into top legal trends that general counsel should prioritize as they continue to navigate 2024’s evolving regulatory landscape related to labor and employment issues and developments. Our presenters will discuss various topics, including challenges related to DEI initiatives and disclosures and the SEC’s focus on separation and severance agreements. They will also revisit the FTC’s non-compete ban and provide relevant updates.Continue Reading Register Now | Key Considerations for General Counsel Webinar

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has announced that on April 23 it will vote on publishing and then adopting a finalized new rule that will prohibit employers from enforcing non-competes against workers. Under the originally proposed rule, non-compete agreements that bar any worker from accepting competing employment or starting a competing business would be prohibited with some exceptions for a limited category of transactions.Continue Reading Register Now | The FTC’s Non-Compete Ban: What Employers Need to Know Webinar

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently issued a decision radically changing how employers may use (or, more accurately, not use) nondisparagement and confidentiality clauses in severance agreements.Continue Reading NLRB Rules that Confidentiality and Nondisparagement Provisions in Severance Agreements Presented to Section 7 Employees are Unlawful

As employees are increasingly returning to the office, a new amendment to existing Tennessee law regarding vaccination further complicates the landscape for employers concerning COVID-19 vaccine mandates.  See the full text of the amendment here.

Chapter 2 of Title 14 of the Tennessee Code, passed in November 2021 by the Tennessee Legislature, prohibits a private business, governmental entity, school, or local education agency from compelling or otherwise taking “adverse action” against a person to compel proof of having received a COVID-19 vaccination if the person objects to being vaccinated “for any reason.”  See TCA 14-2-102(a).  In other words, a private business in Tennessee cannot take adverse action against a person based on their vaccination status.  As you may recall, Title 14 provided private businesses with an opportunity to request an exemption from this blanket restriction on their ability to require proof of vaccination by requesting the comptroller exclude the entity from the purview of this law.Continue Reading New Amendment to the Tennessee COVID-19 Bill Provides Medical and Religious Exemptions to Certain Tennessee Employees Subject to Mandatory Vaccination Policies

Join us for a virtual seminar in which the firm’s labor & employment and employee benefits attorneys will discuss recent COVID-19-related announcements from the CDC, FDA and other relevant agencies, and the implications they have on how employers should structure policies and procedures moving forward.

In this session, we will provide guidance for navigating the