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Lymari Cromwell counsels clients in all aspects of employment and labor relations law, representing industries as diverse as healthcare, hospitality and manufacturing. From medical leaves to background checks, Lymari helps employers keep in step with the constantly changing regulations that impact the workplace, and works to ensure correct interpretation and implementation of the laws. Lymari has assisted with cases ranging from a 3,000-employee wage and hour collective action to a successful federal jury trial in a Title VII discrimination case.

On April 23, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) voted to adopt a monumental final rule prohibiting employers from entering into non-competes against all workers within the jurisdiction of the FTC – a move that is poised to reshape how employers approach employment agreements.Continue Reading Scope and Impact of the FTC’s Non-Compete Rule for Employers

Join us on May 14 for a deep dive into top legal trends that general counsel should prioritize as they continue to navigate 2024’s evolving regulatory landscape related to labor and employment issues and developments. Our presenters will discuss various topics, including challenges related to DEI initiatives and disclosures and the SEC’s focus on separation and severance agreements. They will also revisit the FTC’s non-compete ban and provide relevant updates.Continue Reading Register Now | Key Considerations for General Counsel Webinar

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has announced that on April 23 it will vote on publishing and then adopting a finalized new rule that will prohibit employers from enforcing non-competes against workers. Under the originally proposed rule, non-compete agreements that bar any worker from accepting competing employment or starting a competing business would be prohibited with some exceptions for a limited category of transactions.Continue Reading Register Now | The FTC’s Non-Compete Ban: What Employers Need to Know Webinar

On January 5, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) proposed a new rule that would prohibit employers from imposing non-competes on workers, and, if finalized, will have far reaching implications for many businesses operating in the United States. The proposed ban would make it illegal for employers to enter into or attempt to enter into non-compete agreements with workers, continue to maintain such agreements if they already exist, or represent that a worker is subject to a non-compete. It would further require companies with active non-competes to inform workers that they are void. Under the proposed rule, non-competes that bar workers from accepting competing employment or starting a competing business would be prohibited.

Join us for a webinar in which Bass, Berry & Sims labor & employment and antitrust attorneys will address topics and concerns pertaining to the proposed ban, including:Continue Reading Webinar: The FTC’s Proposed Ban on Non-Competes and What It Could Mean for You

On January 5, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission), an agency charged with enforcing federal antitrust laws and protecting competition, proposed a new rule that would prohibit “employers” from imposing non-competes on “workers.” The proposed ban would make it illegal for employers to enter into or attempt to enter into  non-compete agreements with workers

Effective October 1, 2022, certain providers participating in the Florida Medicaid program will be required to pay direct care workers a minimum of $15 per hour. Below we’ve outlined which organizations are subject to this new requirement and other relevant implementation details.
Continue Reading Florida Medicaid Providers: New $15 Minimum Wage Requirements

Join us for a virtual seminar in which the firm’s labor & employment and employee benefits attorneys will discuss recent COVID-19-related announcements from the CDC, FDA and other relevant agencies, and the implications they have on how employers should structure policies and procedures moving forward.

In this session, we will provide guidance for navigating the

On September 11, in response to a New York federal district court striking down some of the Department of Labor (DOL) regulations regarding the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), the DOL issued guidance (Guidance) affirming in part and revising in part, its regulations. While most of the Guidance does not result in any significant change or consequence to employers, the DOL’s revision of its prior definition of “health care provider” significantly impacts how healthcare entities in the U.S. must implement paid leave benefits under the FFCRA.

Work Availability

The Guidance clarifies that the “work-availability” requirement under the FFCRA applies to all types of leave taken under the FFCRA. In other words, to take any leave under the FFCRA, the FFCRA-qualifying reason must be the actual reason that the employee is unable to work rather than the employer not having work available for the employee to perform. The DOL makes clear in the Guidance that the “work-availability” requirement ensures that employers are not forced to provide paid leave benefits under the FFCRA where the employer would not have had work for the employee to perform, regardless of whether the employee has a qualifying reason for leave under the FFCRA.Continue Reading DOL Issues Another Round of Guidance on FFCRA

Bass, Berry & Sims has provided updated guidance on the employment-related provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and answers to some frequently asked questions regarding the FFCRA regarding providing Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Act (EFMLA) benefits under the Act. This guidance includes answers to some