Wage and Hour Law and Practice

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a Final Rule increasing the salary threshold for Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime exemptions, a move which the DOL anticipates will result in around four million additional workers becoming eligible for overtime pay. Continue Reading DOL Announces Final Overtime Rule Increasing Salary Threshold

On April 1, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published its Worker Walkaround Representative Designation Process Rule, which is set to take effect 30 days after its publication in the Federal Register on May 31, 2024. The new rule broadens workers’ rights to choose who represents them during safety inspections, overwriting an old standard that required the representative to be a fellow employee and opening the door for outside representatives such as those from unions.Continue Reading Can a Non-Employee Join a Safety Inspection? Yes, Under OSHA’s New Worker Walkaround Rule a Non-Employee Can Serve As an Employee Representative During Safety Inspections

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that a highly compensated employee who was paid a guaranteed daily rate but not a guaranteed weekly rate was not properly paid “on a salary basis” and, therefore, was not correctly classified as exempt from overtime pay. In other words, an employee who made in excess of $200,000 a year was still owed overtime pay. The decision highlights the importance of employers meeting the “salary basis” test to satisfy what is commonly referred to as the white-collar exemptions from overtime pay.Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court Rules That a Highly Compensated Employee Paid on a Daily-Rate Basis is Entitled to Overtime Pay

I recently authored an article for Connector, the official magazine of the Steel Erectors Association of America, outlining the types of government contracts and workers impacted by Executive Order 14026 (EO 14026) that increased the minimum hourly wage for certain federal contractors from $10.50 to $15.00. This increase went into effect on January 30, 2022

While we are still in the first half of 2022, it has already been a busy year in terms of labor and employment developments for government contractors. For any companies doing work for the federal government, whether as prime contractors or as subcontractors, it can be challenging to keep up with the perpetually changing requirements, particularly when the changes occur this quickly.
Continue Reading Government Contracts Labor & Employment Developments – Part 1

The past few years have been unprecedented for everyone, but employers have faced particular challenges in trying to keep their employees healthy and able to continue working while simultaneously navigating a significant amount of new – and often confusing – legislation, mandates, and executive orders. Due to these challenges, the focus on best practices for day-to-day management of employees has fallen by the wayside for many employers. However, as we approach the two-year mark since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic and are beginning to see some light at the end of the pandemic tunnel, now is a great time for employers to revisit these best practices that will enable them to better manage their workforces and reduce the risk of employment-related litigation.
Continue Reading Best Practices for Proactively Managing Workplace Issues and Minimizing the Risk of Employment-Related Litigation

Over the past year, the Biden administration has issued a number of labor and employment executive orders applicable to government contractors. Some of those requirements are updates to Obama-era executive orders, while others are new. Together, these obligations, which include an almost 50% increase to the applicable minimum wage, can have a significant impact on contractors.

For any government contractors that have questions about these labor and employment changes, we hope you can join us for an overview of these recent developments.Continue Reading [WEBINAR] What Was Old is New Again – Government Contractor Labor & Employment Updates

Over the past two years, the pandemic has forced employers to navigate in unchartered waters. The focus on health and safety, managing a remote workforce, and staying abreast of the ever-changing COVID-19-related legislation and guidance has left in-house counsel and human resources professionals with little time to focus on many of the fundamental steps that are essential to proactively and successfully managing employee issues. While the challenges associated with COVID-19 remain at the forefront of employers’ concerns, it is time to return to familiar waters and revisit some of the best HR-related practices.

Join us for the first of a three-part virtual seminar in which Bass, Berry & Sims labor & employment attorneys will address best practices across a range of topics that continue to impact day-to-day operations in the workplace and cause potential risk exposure for employers.Continue Reading [WEBINAR] Returning to Familiar Waters – Best Practices for Proactively Managing Workplace Issues and Minimizing the Risk of Employment-Related Litigation